How a 75-year-old bicycle shop survived the ‘bike boom’ accident

Kevin Dunlevy was doing on Tuesday what his late grandfather Joe did when he started Joe Fix Its in 1946 as a general repair shop.

But 75 years later, the downtown Goshen store has grown into a full-service bicycle store and is expanding to other sports equipment.

The modern workshop is still similar to the starter repair shop of decades ago, in that it remains a great meeting place.

“This is a community center,” Dunlevy said of the store. “I think that’s why he was as successful as he was.”


What would you like to know

  • Joe Fix Its, a community bike shop and hangout, just celebrated 75 years in business
  • Owner Brian Dunlevy said the most difficult time he saw walking through the store was not the COVID-19 pandemic, but the mid-1970s when the ‘bike boom’ suddenly took hold. end
  • He credits his community, his father and his employees – not so much to himself – for the store’s long and successful operation.
  • This community bond, said Kevin, is one of the main reasons Patriarch Joe would be thrilled if he could see the store today.

Kevin’s father, Brian, runs the business. He said the most difficult time he had seen walking through the store was not the COVID-19 pandemic, but the mid-1970s when the “Bike Boom” suddenly came to an end.

He said even this sudden drop in sales was manageable.

“It was never a big dive,” he said. “People are always on bikes and think of bikes with a smile on their face.”

Brian Dunlevy credits his community, his father, and his employees – not so much himself – for the store’s long and successful operation.

Kevin Dunlevy has said his father deserves a lot of praise.

Brian Dunlevy often organizes community events, sponsors bike races, and even hosts the “Goshen’s Tour,” which raises funds to support people living with cerebral palsy.

This community bond, said Kevin Dunlevy, is one of the main reasons Joe, the Patriarch, would be thrilled if he could see the store today.

“Being able to serve the community like he did is truly admirable,” Kevin Dunlevy said of his father. “So yes, something to be proud of.”

So what about the future? Will another generation of family and employees take the store to new heights?

“Yeah, maybe 75 more,” laughed Kevin. “We will see.”