Omaha bike shop closes location due to supply chain issues

The 2020 bike boom has been so bountiful for Greenstreet Cycles that it has opened a third store in the village of Aksarben. “The first year of the pandemic for us was very, very different from the second year of the pandemic,” said Greenstreet Cycles owner Ben Swan. The year 2021 has become the year of wheel spins for bike shops. Swan spent her time searching and waiting for parts. “We used to order from a warehouse and now we’re ordering from a hypothetical backorder list,” Swan said. “I could see the first signs of exhaustion,” he said. “I just didn’t want to put our community and all three stores at risk, so I thought, ‘Let’s take one off the table, streamline and simplify our operations’ until inventory and staff can back to some form of new normal.” Omaha lost another beloved bike shop at the start of the pandemic. Olympia Cycles opened in 1971 at 40th and Hamilton streets. As a small store, the owner said it was just time to close. Larger stores, like The Bike Rack, have said they are successful, although some parts are hard to find. “Bikes are made up of hundreds of different parts and if one of them becomes unavailable or is out of stock or stuck on a shipping container, that bike won’t make it here,” the store manager said, Robb Hiatt. Hiatt said manufacturers are taking new paths to deliver as much inventory as possible. “I might not be able to ship the bike if I don’t put anything on it. So let’s put something on it that will be close enough to satisfy the customer,” he said. There are a lot of bikes in the rack now, but if 2022 looks like the past two years, it could all be gone by summer, Hiatt said. He said there are even bikes that are out of stock that could potentially arrive in 2023. “We default to planning for 2023 because a lot of the ETA dates are in 2023,” he said. this ride is going to last, which is another reason Swan decided to pack it downtown, for now. “We don’t want to push ourselves to the point where a decision is irreversible,” Swan said. It’s also time to get your spring tune-up or if you’re looking to buy a new bike, don’t wait. Greenstreet will close its downtown store at the end of February.

The 2020 bike boom has been so bountiful for Greenstreet Cycles that it has opened a third store in the village of Aksarben.

“The first year of the pandemic for us was very, very different from the second year of the pandemic,” said Greenstreet Cycles owner Ben Swan.

The year 2021 has become the year of wheel spins for bike shops. Swan spent her time searching and waiting for parts.

“We used to order from a warehouse and now we’re ordering from a hypothetical backorder list,” Swan said.

He said staff were juggling inventory between three locations, so to relieve the pressure Swan decided to close his store on Harney Street in the city centre.

“I could see the early signs of burnout,” he said. “I just didn’t want to put our community and all three stores at risk, so I thought, ‘Let’s take one off the table, streamline and simplify our operations’ until inventory and staff can back to some form of new normal.”

Omaha lost another beloved bike shop early in the pandemic.

Olympia Cycles opened in 1971 at 40th and Hamilton streets. As a small store, the owner said it was just time to close.

Big stores, like The Bike Rack, have said they are successful, even though some parts are hard to find.

“Bikes are made up of hundreds of different parts and if one of them becomes unavailable or is out of stock or stuck on a container ship, that bike won’t make it here,” the store manager said. , Robb Hiatt.

Hiatt said manufacturers are taking new paths to deliver as much inventory as possible.

“I might not be able to ship the bike if I don’t put anything on it. So let’s put something on it that will be close enough to satisfy the customer,” he said.

There are a lot of bikes in the rack now, but if 2022 looks like the past two years, it could all be gone by summer, Hiatt said. He said there are even bikes that are out of stock that could potentially arrive in 2023.

“We default to planning for 2023 because a lot of ETA dates are in 2023,” he said.

Bike shops don’t know how long this ride will be, which is another reason Swan decided to pack it downtown, for now.

“We don’t want to push ourselves to the point where a decision is irreversible,” Swan said.

It’s also time to get your spring tune-up or if you’re looking to buy a new bike, don’t wait.

Greenstreet will close its downtown store at the end of February.